Home Forums Book Club What’s your favourite book read this year?

Nelle96 Posted 4 months ago
What’s your favourite book read this year?

Mine is Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell. Although billed as about Shakespeare’s son, it is really the tale of Agnes (whom we all know as Ann Hathaway) from a headstrong young woman to a wife and mother in difficult circumstances with an often absent husband – and I loved her story. The final few pages I found truly moving.

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10 likes & 103 replies
    • iaints 19th August 2021 at 8:47 pm

      A big Fantasy reader, done the LOTR/Hobbit books, loved them. However, my favourite writer is Raymond E Feist. Currently on the second of the new Firemane Saga. Just finished Steven Erikson’s Gardens of the Moon, book one in the Malazan book of the Fallen. Very good read.

      Reply
      • Nelle96 30th August 2021 at 9:53 am

        Fantasy isn’t a genre I personally enjoy but LOTR has always been my husband’s favourite book, he says there are so many layers to it.

        Reply
    • Sue47 19th August 2021 at 9:34 pm

      The Complete Nonsense of Edward Lear. I was given my copy in 1955, the dust cover is in two halves but the book in good unmarked condition for its age. Very well read by myself, then my children, grandchildren and now great-grandchildren. It’s a book that adults and children alike can pick up and put down, trouble is once picked up it’s very difficult to put down!

      Reply
    • Sixpence 19th August 2021 at 10:34 pm

      My favourite books are written by Di Morrissey she’s an Australian . Writes a lot of novels that include the aborigines and their traditions

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    • Lynda Renham 19th August 2021 at 11:11 pm

      It has to be London Belongs To Me by Norman Collins. Brilliant!

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    • Chi 19th August 2021 at 11:11 pm

      I have just re-read The Border Trilogy by Cormac McCarthy. I remember being mesmerised by it when I first read it some 20 years ago and it was just as good this time around (except a bit easier to understand with Google Translate on my mobile!). Masterful, unique writing draws you into the narrative. Shame it was made into such a terrible film!

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      • Nelle96 20th August 2021 at 7:59 am

        Many years ago I read The Road. My god, that book stayed with me for a very long time.

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        • Chi 20th August 2021 at 3:08 pm

          An all-time favourite of mine too! I was in floods of tears when I got to the end, reading it on a bench by the beach while on holiday with my then-baby son and people stopped to ask if I was alright! A tad embarrassing…

          Reply
    • louisebarrow490 20th August 2021 at 8:15 am

      100 year old man who climbed out of the window. He has some crazy adventures and accidentally becomes involved with some drug gang and they meet creative ends.

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    • Firefighter 1 20th August 2021 at 8:49 am

      I am reading Imagine heaven by John Burke and I will look at life in a completely different way now

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    • Glasgow Annie 24th August 2021 at 4:35 pm

      Thanks I have read all of Hilary Mantels and Adrian McKinties books recently and some poetry books…I can listen to my books on Audible for hours a day as I am not able to do much else my RA is bad and my hands are pretty useless

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    • Smitch 26th August 2021 at 7:58 am

      Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart. On the surface about poverty, alcoholism, pride and burgeoning homosexuality in 1970s Glasgow but also the story of a young boy’s love for his mother.
      Many English people don’t realise that there is a Scottish language and I was one of them. I always thought that Scottish was just English spoken with a Scottish accent. This book has Glasgow voices and is written in their language.

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      • Melanie Jane 14th September 2021 at 4:06 pm

        Great to hear. Literally just bought this about 20mins ago! Am looking forward to it, and preparing to be emotionally wrung out! Talking about reading the Scottish language, have you read Skagaboys by Irvine Walsh? Truly engrossing, and a complete eye-opener in respect of the language. Definitely not a quick read (for an English speaker anyway) and, as with all of Walsh’s work, disturbing and very thought-provoking.

        Reply
    • Nelle96 26th August 2021 at 8:26 am

      Yes I agree. A superb book. Grim but ultimately a seam of redemption running through it thanks to Shuggie’s spirit and love for his mum.

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    • BicesterDave 30th August 2021 at 8:00 am

      The Salt Path is absolutely amazing

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      • Nelle96 30th August 2021 at 9:16 am

        I think it’s an astonishing story but I did find myself getting a bit frustrated with them. A lot of their challenges seemed to arise through carelessness and naivety – running out of water, camping on a cliff edge – even losing their home. But that aspect made what they achieved it all the more surprisingly I suppose.

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    • Berlinjonny 30th August 2021 at 8:06 am

      ‘You Will Be Safe Here’ by Damian Barr. Story of South Africa and the ramifications of the Boer War. Really enjoyed it !

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    • Countrywalker 30th August 2021 at 11:11 am

      For me its probably: ‘Exit’ by Belinda Bauer. The theme does seem rather dark, but with an intriguing plot, great characters and dialogue and very funny in places I really enjoyed this one.

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    • Anonymous User (no longer active) 30th August 2021 at 11:21 am

      Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow (Yuval Noah Harari)

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    • Nelle96 30th August 2021 at 12:43 pm

      Hi sorry I meant intellectually accessible ie easy to read and understand without any specialist knowledge

      Reply
    • BridJames 2nd September 2021 at 3:51 pm

      I finally got around to reading a book that I’d had for a while but decided to read after the previous book, which was a novel, had referred to the same subject. That previous book was in a series of railway detective novels by Edward Marston and the story is set mainly in Swindon which to quite a few people will be familiar as the main railway town in the GWR region.
      The book which I initially referred to is the true history of the vast railway engineering works which developed and the town which grew as a result.
      It’s called The Great Western at Swindon Works by A S Peck who himself was previously employed on the site so a reliable source of information.
      I recommend it to anyone who is interested enough in the subject. It’s about 300 pages long and a large A4 sized hardback and although quite detailed is never really too technical and the generous amount of photos and illustrations complement the text nicely.

      Reply
    • TNT 11th September 2021 at 1:00 pm

      The cuckoo’s egg by Clifford Stoll

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    • MaggieWhite21 14th September 2021 at 3:45 pm

      This year’s 3 best reads are Hamnet, Where the Crawdads sing, and A Gentleman in Moscow…

      Reply
    • MaggieWhite21 14th September 2021 at 5:38 pm

      He has a new book coming out in the autumn. We’ve requested it as our December book club book… 🙂

      Reply
    • MaggieWhite21 14th September 2021 at 5:40 pm

      I also enjoy books by Eric Newby. They are quite old now, but A Walk in the Hindu Kush is well worth reading. Very pertinent now…

      Reply
    • Sand 14th September 2021 at 5:49 pm

      “Us Three” by Ruth Jones, I enjoyed this book, I have never read any others of hers. It is a book you have to finish to find out how things turn out.

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    • Raven1966 24th September 2021 at 9:09 pm

      Liquid Gold, Roger Morgan-Grenville.

      Reply
    • Nelle96 1st October 2021 at 6:57 am

      Sounds interesting as I’d like to take up photography as a hobby

      Reply
    • SaraE 2nd October 2021 at 12:38 pm

      Non-fiction – The Serendipity Mindset by Dr. Christian Busch. I’ve found it fascinating as he considers this a life skill we can all learn. It’s not a heavy-weight theory type book, I was worried it would be, instead it’s readable with some great stories.

      Fiction – I’ve been reading C J Sansom’s Shardlake series. They’re historical mystery novels set during Henry VIII’s reign. I wasn’t sure how I’d get on with them and then couldn’t put them down!

      Reply
    • alexnathan 17th November 2021 at 4:47 pm

      I finally got around to reading a book that I’d had for a while but decided to read after the previous book, which was a novel, had referred to the same subject.

      That previous book was in a series of railway detective novels by Edward Marston and the story is set mainly in Swindon which to quite a few people will be familiar as the main railway town in the GWR region.

      The book which I initially referred to is the true history of the vast railway engineering works which developed and the town which grew as a result.

      It’s called The Great Western at Swindon Works by A S Peck who himself was previously employed on the site so a reliable source of information.

      I recommend it to anyone who is interested enough in the subject.

      It’s about 300 pages long and a large A4 sized hardback and although quite detailed is never really too technical and the generous amount of photos and illustrations complement the text nicely.
      ___________________________________
      https://www.bancroftclothing.com/

      Reply
    • MalcolmC 17th November 2021 at 5:00 pm

      Mine was Midnight Library by Matt Haig. An interesting view on life.

      I have also been listening to some audiobooks and Beautiful by Katie Piper was by terms tragic and life affirming. A story of triumph over adversity that I very much appreciated.

      Reply
    • Deb1964 27th November 2021 at 7:46 am

      I’ve just finished the Thursday Murder Club, what a lovely surprise.
      I originally had dismissed it as not my type of book but it was recommended to me by a colleague and it’s hilarious and very well written.
      Just ordered his next book

      Reply
    • VickiLynne 27th November 2021 at 9:27 am

      Although I haven’t read it this year, my favourite all-time book is The Mountain is Young by Han Suyin. It’s set in 1950s Kathmandu and with the backdrop of the Himalayas, explores themes around love, race, colonialism and religion. Sounds heavy but is actually a beautiful read.

      Reply
    • dresser 27th November 2021 at 4:09 pm

      Anne Cleeves Telllng Tales based on the series Vera

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    • lily49 28th November 2021 at 8:53 am

      Agree with Hamnet, ,l was loaned it by a fellow book addict.
      Have also just read a loaned book,the language of flowers by Vanessa diffenbaugh,
      and CJ Samson the Shardlake series, unputdownable.
      Also, Mark Hewson,,he writes cracking detective stories,all very well researched and accurate in their location details.

      Reply
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