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  • Rest Less Book Bucket List – Discuss and recommend your favourite books of all time!

    While we might read many books during our lifetime – there are usually only a few that stick with us long after we’ve read that final chapter. Those books are usually the most thought-provoking or emotive, or have a unique narrative style. When a book is particularly special to us, it’s normal to not only want to re-read it, but to want to discuss and recommend it to others, and to go in search of other books that will have a profound effect on us.

    We’d love to know which of your favourite books you think should be added to the Rest Less book bucket list. Perhaps a book made you laugh, cry, gave you hope, or changed your life by showing you an entirely new perspective on the world. Please tell us what these books are, and what makes them a must-read!

     

    Posted by Elise
    • Reply by JaneBD

      I always seem to return to Daphne du Maurier as an author, but I am reading Gone with the Wind for the umpteenth time! A book that had a big impact on me was Elizabeth is missing by Emma Healey!

      • Reply by Lisa J

        Gone with the Wind. First book I stayed up reading under the covers until 3 in the morning. I must have been about 14. Just the right age to fall in love with Rhett Butler. 🙂

        • Reply by DebyMilne

          I liked that book too. Have you read the follow up? Scarlett. by Alexandra Ripley. It was surprisingly good too.

      • Reply by Glad31

        I loved Elizabeth is Missing. It was made into a drama for tv too and was brilliant!
        As for Daphne de Maurier Rebecca is one of my favourite books ever. 😃

    • Reply by Anonymous User

      Too many to choose from but The Road by Cormac McCarthy springs to mind. I love Jack Kerouac and Big Sur is a particular favourite.

      • Reply by Andy Paddles

        The Road is an outstanding book with unusually an equally good film.

        I did enjoy On the Road by Kerouac, however around the same time I read The Autobiography of a Super Tramp – fascinating. And what a great title for something written at the beginning of the century!

    • Reply by Anonymous User

      Hi, my most recent reads have been Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, The Casual Vacancy, J K Rowling and just about everything by Louise Candlish, I’m hooked!

    • Reply by aspie auntie

      Sue Townshend’s Adrian Mole books were much enjoyed in our house.   My elder sister read the first one when her son WAS 13 3/4!  She talks about everyday stuff and I  think, ‘oh, we’ve done that’.  For instance, when Adrian has to help out his elderly neighbour, Bert Baxter, he’s shocked to find red stains on Baxter’s bedsheets, thinking there’s been an accident.  It turns out Baxter had some beetroot sandwiches and the juice dripped.  Later on, my mum went to the GP saying she had blood in her pee.  On examination, it was found to be beetroot juice, so my brother was calling her Bert Baxter!

    • Reply by Lisa J

      Just re-read ‘A Town Like Alice’. Soooooooooo beautiful. What a story. Also would really recommend Greg Iles trilogy beginning with ‘Natchez Burning’. Bit of a naff title as it is an obvious play on ‘Mississippi Burning’ and the story is built around racism and segregation in the Deep South, but my goodness it is a thrilling read. I ended up buying the third book directly from the States as I couldn’t wait for it to be released in the UK. It is grim reading sometimes, but a real page-turner all the same.

      • Reply by Lynn R

        I read A Town Like Alice as a child and have re-read it several times since.  I loved it then and I love it now.  It inspired me to travel to Australia as soon as I could afford it which took until I was 42 years old!

      • Reply by Michele1961

        I have read the trilogy enjoyed it very much. John Grisham a time to kill and a time of mercy are excellent also and similar theme

    • Reply by Somethingshort

      I love a good thriller at bedtime. It guarantees me not to sleep until I absolutely have to.

      I enjoyed Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. I never thought I would plough through that, but hey……I got totally lost and then went through the Trilogy.

      Books that make me laugh. Adam Kay springs to mind. I love his humour.

      Anybody missing their local libraries? I am.  I’m a member of three and miss spending those idle hours. I especially like craft/home/cooking books which are always the heaviest to carry. It never ceases to astound me how many books you can have out on one ticket. How many?!

      Like people do National Trust Houses….or Churches. Well, I do local libraries. Always fascinating.

      • Reply by aspie auntie

        Adam Kay was on Sunday Brunch recently.

        • Reply by Somethingshort

          Hi Aspie Aunti, What is Sunday Brunch?

        • Reply by aspie auntie

          It’s a daytime magazine show on Channel 4 hosted by Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer.  They interview guests and do a bit of cookery.

    • Reply by kandy

      Hi

      My name is Kandy and have read a lot of fiction.  Agatha Christie has got to be the best.  There is always J K Rowlings.  These books are so well written and most enjoyable.  I use this as a way of an escape from reality.  I also have read most of the classics.  Then there is George Orwell 1984 and this fits in with what is happening around us CCTV etc, etc, etc.

       

      I used to go to a creative writing group and miss this immensely, I hope and pray this pandemic comes to an end soon so that we can get on with our lives.  I also have tried to write short stories.

      Please reply soon.

      Yours faithfully

      Kandy

      xxx

       

      • Reply by Somethingshort

        Hi Kandy, Writing can be so therapeutic, cathartic. Why don’t you try writing about your days during the epidemic? I think we will look back on this time in years to come and wonder. We need people like you to record our lives as they are today. I enjoy writing letters – I’ve been doing it for years and I know the recipients enjoy them too. Once upon a time I broke my arm…..and couldn’t write. I went out of my mind because I didn’t realise how cathartic those letters really were and how settling they were for my well being.

        Enjoy your day…….you could be the next budding author.

    • Reply by duncan

      Currently working my way thorough the “Sword of Truth” series  by Terry Goodkind a nice long series of books ideal for lockdown, but do have the Wheel of Time series also to read if I run out 😀

      • Reply by DebyMilne

        Brilliant series. Read it a few times. Try Stephen Donaldson next. The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever. Really good too.

        • Reply by duncan

          Thank you I will give that a go 🙂

    • Reply by g

      My fav all time book is “to kill a mocking bird’.. I learned so much at a young age about oppression /racism and courage.  My fav character was Atticus Finch a lawyer in a small town who did his duty and defended Boo Bradley on jumped up charges.  It taught me to do the right thing no matter what others think or say.. it was def the right book at the right time being published just as the Civil Rights Movement was gaining momentum. The book is narrated though the eyes of a child..

      • Reply by aspie auntie

        My mum had this book.  I liked reading about the people in the town of Maycomb that Scout, Jem and Dill came into contact with.  When Scout first goes to school she seems a lot better at reading than the other children – she also compares someone’s abrupt sentences to Mr Jingle in a Dickens novel, which is the same comparison some TV critics brought up referring to Simon Callow as Tom in ‘Chance In A Million’!

      • Reply by NickyW

        My daughter named our first grandchild Atticus.  I was very surprised as I had never read the book – I have now!  Wonder what they will named number 2?🤔

        • Reply by Rich Stringer

          Maybe their 2nd could be called Finch ha ha. Enjoyed the way the book led the reader through each strand and character, really loved the “reveal” of Boo at the end

    • Reply by g

      To all who need a laugh and like to hold a mirror up to current events I suggest . Identity Crisis by Ben Elton.  Honest it is well written and at times you will be laughing.

    • Reply by Somethingshort

      Dare I say this……Marie Kondo. I’ve Marie Kondo-ed everything in sight. Now THAT was cathartic.

      I just love a DOING book.

    • Reply by NickyW

      Oh dear, where to start?  On a recent trip to the opticians my young (25 odd) assistant and I were swapping book titles.  We both liked SciFi and she suggested an author I’d not come across before — Robin Hobb.

      Well it just goes to show we can reach across the age gap! The Rain Wilder series is some of the best writing I’ve come across in a while – the authors imagination is quite simply spell binding.  I would highly recommend if you enjoy scifi/fantasy.

      Another author I came across by accident is Justin Cronin, I was looking to see if he was perhaps related to A J Cronin who’s books I read many years ago.  The Passage trilogy describes the end of the world as we know it – but a fantastic story.  Hopefully not too close to where we currently find ourselves!

      Currently reading Stephen Lawheads Pendragon trilogy, just recently discovered him and enjoying them immensely.

      Other authors I’ve really enjoyed – Conn Iggulden, his Genghis Kahn books were fabulous; Christian Jacq and his wonderful stories on Egypt and surprisingly Winston Churchills books on WWII, he was a wonderful writer, full of dry wit and humour in devastating times!!

      So many books, so little time…

      • Reply by Michele1961

        I have read Robin Hobb the farsee trilogy absolutely brilliant.

      • Reply by Michele1961

        If you like Robin hobb try the forsee trilogy brilliant

    • Reply by Anonymous User

      Used to like action books, Lee Childs Jack Reacher, easy reading but recently, on recommendation, developed a taste for C J Samson’s Shardlake series e.g. Dissolution.

      • Reply by Rachel29

        Yep, reallylike the Shardlake series.

      • Reply by Andy Paddles

        Lee Child – tales of Jack Reacher, perfect chilled out escapism. However, if ever there was a film that shouldn’t have been made, Tom Cruise would fit in Reacher’s shirt pocket!

    • Reply by Rachel29

      Struggling to come up with a single title. Bookshelf is groaning with Margaret Attwood, Sebastian Faulks and Charles Dickens! Jonathon Livingstone Seagull was a game changer as a teenager, I cried my eyes out over The Time Traveller’s Wife. Ray Celestin’s crime novels are really well written and contain scary detail about life as a black or mixed race person in US settings.
      OK I concede defeat, I cannot pick a single book. I am gazing at the bookcase and just see old friends.

    • Reply by Somethingshort

      Eleanar Oliphant is fine….Loved it. It was so out of its box wasn’t it.

      • Reply by Ruthieb

        Ooh good, just ordered this.

    • Reply by AdrianSF

      As an avid book reader from childhood(my dad told us it was educational ) I have read literally thousands of books and I generally get a good feeling from most(I’m easy to please )I do love fiction though. I once swore I’d never read a book written by this one particular author, because I didn’t like the subject matter/connection.
      When I was in hospital on one of my many visits as an in-patient, I picked up a Readers Digest condensed book with 4 abridged novels in it, of which one was by my particular author I wouldn’t read.
      Well, I read it and was hooked from the first page to the last. I managed to collect all of his works and the last collaboration with his son, all in hardback, for my collection. The author Dick Francis was (alas no more ) one of the greatest story-tellers of the 20th century, in my eyes. You always took immediately to the main character and rooted for them and I was both sad at the end but glad that I’d read such a cracking good read. I know it’s not in the same league as some of the previous posters on here but I defy anyone to read one and not want to follow it up with another.
      Sorry for rambling, thanks for reading this, whatever it is.🐴

    • Reply by Somethingshort

      I’d like to know how people come to reading……what age……..when I was a child we never had books. I’m still terribly embarrassed to admit this. We had a Bible…..and my Mum used to have True Romances under the sofa cushions with her stockings! I was desperate to read……I went to the library occasionally with my Dad……but the books then never had pictures. They were always hardbacks, usually in blue or red, with just a title. So, I know you should never judge a sausage by its skin (or a book by its cover)…..but……I do now. Unfortunately, I realise that a lot of books of the same genre are totally the same on the outside. I hate these shiny slithery modern covers. Ugh. Tactility (is that a word?)…….it isn’t just a book title though, is it? I love it when the pages are wafer thin…….oh. Luxury. You have to be so careful when turning the pages. It isn’t just a book title for me…..it’s lots of other things too that go into making a good book.
      I made sure that my children had plenty of books when they were growing up. I didn’t have to skimp because charity shops offered loads of them for children, I made sure they treated them nicely too. I’m reaping the rewards now as my first grandchild (ten months old) loves the few books that she has. I will make sure that there is always an abundance of books and someone to show you an interest in those books.
      My other half disagrees totally….he says “it’s the words that matter”. But he is a heavy reader.

    • Reply by DansNan

      My favourite book or series of books was the Dark Tower series by Stephen King. King at his best I think. I always saw Clint Eastwood in my head as the Gunslinger. Have read all six books at least twice now and they are languishing quietly on my kindle waiting to be read again.

    • Reply by Hala

      If this is a man by Primo Levi _ always trying to undertstand the holocaust and after reading this I felt like I d been there – sick and ill . On the subject of Jane Austen Persausion is her best most mature novel .

      • Reply by Aqualady51

        Primo Levi’s writing is amazing. If you vet want to get to the raw feeling of something he takes you there. So sad he was unable to get past the pain of his experiences. His books on the Holocaust should be on every curriculum.

    • Reply by Glad31

      I am a big Stephen King fan and have all of his books. I love them all and couldn’t pick a favourite.
      The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle is probably my favourite outside of that. It’s a combination of Agatha Chistie and Groundhog Day all rolled into one. It is written by Stu Turton and well worth a read. 😃

    • Reply by Andy Paddles

      Over the years I have devoured everything written by Terry Pratchett – witty, insightful and entertaining. The first Christmas without a new hardback Disc world novel to start during my Christmas Morning Bath (I do of course bathe at other times – usually Easter whether I need one or not!) felt like the end of an era!

      Sam Vimes a role model for the modern age! In fact, Vimes for PM!

    • Reply by Adeline

      The Shadow of the wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafron, a real masterpiece

      • Reply by Estrella515

        Yes, he is very good, pity he won’t be able to write more…he sadly died recently

        • Reply by Adeline

          Oh really? Thanks for the info Estrella. He wrote a follow up which I found hard to get into.

    • Reply by Flame17

      I would go to the library until I had read all of Wilbur smiths, then have a break and look for another author to follow, including Dick Francis, Jany Eyre, Little women still come to mind after 70 yr. so many and still new ones arriving.

    • Reply by Ruthieb

      The one that stays with me is a Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini which is life in Afghanistan from a female perspective which I found very moving

      • Reply by Adeline

        I like that one too. Have you read his first book -The kite runner. It was made into a film and performed on stage too.

      • Reply by Aqualady51

        Ruthieb not sure if you like non-fiction, but I would highly recommend Victoria Doubleday’s ‘Three Women of Herat’. It’s written before the Russian invasion and gives a glimpse into a life that no longer exists due to war and the Taliban. I thoroughly enjoyed this book when I read it quite a long time ago!!

    • Reply by Ruthieb

      Yes that was good too. Also read And The Mountains Echoed which if you enjoyed those two books, you might like.

    • Reply by Zoya

      The Stand by Stephen King

    • Reply by Estrella515

      I have enjoyed many books but there is one that sticks to my mind… Jane Eyre, it’s my absolute favourite!

      It is written with such mastery…it is much more than a love book, it’s a book of life.
      I also recommend any book by Spanish author Rosa Montero, she is brilliant!

    • Reply by Baby dee

      Dracula bram stoker and The picture of Dorian Gray
      Ive read these novels several times amazing gothic horror !!!!
      beautifully written and takes you back in to the historical era these books are set in….
      A must read over and over again…

    • Reply by Rich Stringer

      Have read the Dune series of books by Frank Herbert so many times and every time I get something new from the stories and characters, which is probably more to do with my viewpoint on life changing as I get older rather than anything in the books themselves

    • Reply by AnneM

      I am a voracious reader and get through about 70 books a year – fiction and non fiction. I review on Netgalley… recently I read a series of books by Laura Laakso about a private investigator called Yannia Wilde. This is no ordinary PI though. The books are supernatural and full of magic folk and nastiness. I loved them. Also read philosophy, psychology, politics… basically anything. I was the kid with her nose in a book constantly or reading the side of the porridge packet…

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