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Elise Posted 1 year ago
Rest Less Book Bucket List – Discuss and recommend your favourite books of all time!

While we might read many books during our lifetime – there are usually only a few that stick with us long after we’ve read that final chapter. Those books are usually the most thought-provoking or emotive, or have a unique narrative style. When a book is particularly special to us, it’s normal to not only want to re-read it, but to want to discuss and recommend it to others, and to go in search of other books that will have a profound effect on us.

We’d love to know which of your favourite books you think should be added to the Rest Less book bucket list. Perhaps a book made you laugh, cry, gave you hope, or changed your life by showing you an entirely new perspective on the world. Please tell us what these books are, and what makes them a must-read!

 

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29 likes & 321 replies
    • MalcolmC 19th September 2021 at 3:20 pm

      I have always been an avid reader and my mum said I used to read the ceral packets at the breakfast table. When I was old enough I would go down to the library on every Saturday and take out 4 books (the maximum number of tickets they allowed). So selecting books to pass on it hard. However, these are my recommendations.

      A childhood favorite that I passed down to my children was “The Tale Of The Land Of Green Ginger’ by Noel Langley (original version not the editted republished one). A hilarious story of the adventures of Alladin’s son.

      My Teenage favourites were “A Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley and Tolkein’s “Hobbit” and “Lord Of The Rings” trilogy. I first read them aged 15 and read the complete trilogy in 5 days.

      Books I read to my children, until they were old enough to read for themselves were the Harry Potter ones. Not Booker Prize winning but and accessible way for a dad like me to pass on a love of reading, which I am glad to say was successful.

      A book that has stayed with me and one that I would highly recommend “The Remains Of The Day” by Kazuo Ishiguro. Beautifully written.

      My guilty pleasures are the Pern books by Anne Mccaffrey and the Asterix books written by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo.

      Reply
      • Chi 19th September 2021 at 8:25 pm

        There is a street in Hull (my home town) called Land of Green Ginger but nobody really knows why… Is this related to that book I wonder?

        Reply
      • Jackben137 15th October 2021 at 12:03 am

        Hi Malcolm, you should check out a couple of books that I have written: Jack Benson: Thd Life of a Victorian Fellow and The Tales of Atalquar. I would be interested in what you thought of them. Available on Amazon kindle and paperback.

        Reply
        • MalcolmC 15th October 2021 at 7:53 am

          Hi

          Thank you for your message. It is always nice hear from/meet authors. I have bought Jack Benson; Kindle version as I don’t have the space for the library I would love to have. I will give it a go and let you know what I thought of it.

          Reply
        • Jackben137 15th October 2021 at 8:16 am

          Thanks Malcolm, I hope you enjoy it.

          Reply
      • aspie auntie 17th October 2021 at 8:14 pm

        I can remember Kenneth Williams telling the Tale Of The Land Of Green Ginger on Jackanory!

        Reply
    • Wakeel 20th September 2021 at 4:14 am

      Most books by Nora Roberts make me feel good. I know she is a Mills & Boon author however apart from the romantic basis to her books she really is a wonderful story teller

      Reply
    • BrenB 4th October 2021 at 8:48 am

      John Boyne -The Hearts Invisible Fury – a wonderful story journeying through the life of a boy /man from when his mother is cast out of an Irish church pregnant to his ups and downs of life . Some very sad moments but an amazing tale.
      From the author of The Boy in The Pink Pyjamas.
      Also Klara and the Sun by Ishiguro within a few pages you are captivated by the story told by an android!

      Reply
    • Pennypitstop 4th October 2021 at 10:17 pm

      Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens wonderful book very poignant you won’t be able to put it down.

      Reply
    • carolerowe1954 5th October 2021 at 10:09 am

      The Mercies, a stunningly good read about the strength of women even when they are accused of witchcraft.

      Reply
    • reliquit 5th October 2021 at 1:49 pm

      For sheer entertainment value, my choice would have to be “Jupiter’s Travels” by Ted Simon. In the early 1970s, Ted (a builder by trade) who was at a very low point in his life, set off on an ill-equipped and ill-prepared attempt to ride solo around the world on a borrowed motorcycle. No support team, no medics or mechanics – just Ted and a 500cc BSA. The book is his account of that 4-year trip. It see-saws from the heartbreakingly sad to the side splittingly funny. Along the way he was robbed, assaulted, shot at, spat at and arrested (more than once). When Ted eventually returned to the UK, his bent and battered motorcycle was displayed in the museum in the BSA factory near Coventry, and when BSA went bankrupt, it was seized by Coventry City Council in lieu of unpaid business rates. It is currently on display in Coventry’s Transport Museum.

      Reply
    • Sand 12th October 2021 at 3:58 pm

      I loved most Catherine Cookson books, but the most memorable was the trilogy “The Boy David” can not remember the titles of all of them. I can’t say I enjoyed the story, it is harrowing, but I had to finish all of them.

      Reply
    • Lynn61 13th October 2021 at 3:16 pm

      The Kashmir Shawl read a while ago but thoroughly enjoyed it.

      Reply
    • valwiki 14th October 2021 at 8:26 pm

      I’ve just read ‘The Power of Now’ by Eckhart Tolle and it has given me a totally new perspective on life and living.

      Reply
    • Baldybloke 14th October 2021 at 8:43 pm

      May I suggest the following:
      Harpo Speaks. The autobiography of Harpo Marx
      Divide by Jason Hickel
      Post Growth by Tim Jackson
      Wildwood by Roger Deakin
      Fat of the Land by John Seymour

      Reply
    • Anonymous User (no longer active) 15th October 2021 at 8:02 am

      The Oxford English Dictionary, full folio edition. Massive, but fantastic. Okay, you don’t sit and read it cover to covers, but dip in from time to time like you might a Chinese Take Away and revel in the excitement of discovering words.

      Reply
    • helenedevane1 17th October 2021 at 8:43 am

      The Idiot, Dostoevsky or The Source by James Michener

      Reply
    • Sand 17th October 2021 at 11:10 am

      As I have a lousy memory and have read many books in my life. I would recommend the book I am reading at this time. It is called “The Songbird” by Marcia Willett I have never read any others by her. I am halfway through and enjoying this story.

      Reply
    • Johng133 21st October 2021 at 9:56 am

      Hello everyone recently retired and new to Restless.I’m now planning my next adventure and wonder if anyone could recommend any self help books dealing with midlife life in retirement similar to books like Bolder by Carl Honore or You Part Two by Campbell Macpherson and Jane Macpherson I just want to make the very best of this new stage of my life ultimately deciding on a list of experiences and setting out to achieve them

      Reply
    • Buster66 22nd October 2021 at 10:35 am

      Oliver twist

      Reply
    • Deleted User 4th November 2021 at 5:58 am

      Since I first read it in my early teens “My family and other animals” by Gerald Durrell has remained my all time favourite book. The true story of the young Geralds early life in Corfu with his eccentric family is a magical journey filled with warmth, humour, wonder and joy. I read it at least once a year.

      Reply
    • Mago 12th November 2021 at 10:41 pm

      Slightly biased but my favourite book of all time is:

      “The Celtic Fringe”

      This is a journey of discovery made by the author over a period of some 30+years, tracing the heritage of his family back to the West of Ireland following the turn up of some old family photo’s from the 1920’s/30’s.
      It also delves further back to Celtic times & the significant role in which the clan played a significant role in the history of Ireland.
      It traces the subsequent diaspora of the extended family, primary to England, America, Canada & New Zealand.
      Granted this is of somewhat limited demand to those of the same name but the book was published on Amazon in 2019 & has has sold 300 copies so far.

      Oh & the author is Nick Geraghty

      Reply
    • Fuff 18th November 2021 at 8:24 pm

      A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson. I just loved the main character and grew so fond of him as I got through the book. And such a twist in the tale at the very end. Life after life by the same author is almost as good

      Reply
    • diggerssenior 19th November 2021 at 12:39 pm

      Ken Follett, Gerald Seymour, Caitlan Moran.

      Reply
    • Hal W 27th November 2021 at 10:51 am

      If you enjoy fantasy then the Thomas Covenant novels by Stephen Donaldson are well worth reading (if a little bleak).
      Alternatively, in historical fiction the Matthew Shardlake stories by C. J. Samson are excellent.
      Another interest of mine is the history of things we take for granted. “The perfection of the paperclip” by James Ward is a delightful exploration of things we find on desks and the fact they didn’t just magically appear one day.
      Currently reading “The Well of Loneliness” by Radclyffe Hall, and greatly enjoying it.

      Reply
    • Jane S 9th December 2021 at 12:48 pm

      100 years of solitude by Marquez… for the sheer joy of Magic Realism..

      Reply
    • DenisetheMenace 11th December 2021 at 10:08 am

      I loved ‘Himself’ by Jess Kidd. A total surprise, with such interesting characters and twists all along the way. Her writing really engaged me and I finished the last third in one go. Couldn’t stop.

      Reply
    • jackkidman123 11th December 2021 at 12:49 pm

      Those books are usually the most thought-provoking or emotive, or have a unique narrative style.

      When a book is particularly special to us, it’s normal to not only want to re-read it, but to want to discuss and recommend it to others, and to go in search of other books that will have a profound effect on us.

      We’d love to know which of your favourite books you think should be added to the Rest Less book bucket list.

      Perhaps a book made you laugh, cry, gave you hope, or changed your life by showing you an entirely new perspective on the world.
      —————————————————
      http://www.hiddentrails.com/

      Reply
    • CJB 15th December 2021 at 8:25 am

      mmm… if autobiographies are allowed then 2 books that make me smile just recalling their titles are ‘Moon’s a Balloon’ and ‘Bring on the Empty Horses’ both by David Niven. Read just recently & found fascinating was a biography of John Le Carre called ‘The Pidgeon Tunnel’

      Reply
      • Jackben137 20th December 2021 at 2:04 pm

        Hi CJB, both of those stores by Niven are great; read them many years ago. If you enjoy biographies, you could do a lot worse than in reading, Is That It by Bob Geldorf and The Ragman’s Son by Kirk Douglas; both fantastic books.

        Reply
    • mikecambrai 17th December 2021 at 10:31 am

      Way back in the 60’s one author stands out and that is Neville Shute. His ‘A Town like Alice’ was made into an excellent film, but I particularly remember ‘No Highway’. Neville Shute was an aeronautical engineer, and this story written in the 40’s predated the ‘Comet’ disasters in that it is a story about airframe fatigue. Shute always mixed a human story with any technical storyline and this reminiscence has prompted me to start to reread his many stories.
      Of course ‘The day of the Triffids’ was an unputdownable book at that time too.

      Reply
    • Helsbelles 27th December 2021 at 1:38 pm

      Top 5 (I can’t just pick one).
      Emma by Jane Austen – or any of her books tbh
      To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
      A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
      The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim
      His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman (I’m cheating with that one as it’s a trilogy!)

      Reply
    • Wakeel 29th December 2021 at 11:18 am

      We won a War by John Akehurst. This book covers the relatively unknown war between Oman and Yemen. It is such a good read. It is special for me as I served on secondment from the British Army

      Reply
    • aidenjackson11 1st January 2022 at 1:04 pm

      . When a book is particularly special to us, it’s normal to not only want to re read it, but to want to discuss and recommend it to others, and to go in search of other books that will have a profound effect on us.

      We’d love to know which of your favourite books you think should be added to the Rest Less book bucket list.

      Perhaps a book made you laugh, cry, gave you hope, or changed your life by showing you an entirely new perspective on the world.
      —————————————
      https://minutemenmb.com/

      Reply
    • Fuff 4th January 2022 at 8:56 am

      A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson, brilliant book 😊

      Reply
    • Silversurfer999 21st January 2022 at 5:29 pm

      The Languages of Kindness A Nurses Story. Christie Watson
      As a former nurse during 1959-176 as a Psychiatric nurse / Ward sister. I recognise the time Christie talks about. I was driven to explore ways to become / stay healthy mentally and physically both necessary for the enjoyment of life Health Promotion was the way to help others.

      Reply
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