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Fluff Posted 10 months ago
Hi people, Can anyone give a recommendation on an autobiography of a rock star where they do not go up their own Harris? Thanks. :)
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    • Gary K 30th March 2021 at 8:14 pm

      Neil Young’s autobiography.

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    • Gary K 30th March 2021 at 8:14 pm

      Neil Young’s autobiography.

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      • Fluff 30th March 2021 at 8:17 pm

        How does he ‘Come across’? I know that he had a lot of Drug problems.

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        • Gary K 2nd April 2021 at 1:55 pm

          He’s obviously an intelligent guy. Very into engineering, mechanics and obviously music. Quite opinionated on his pet subjects. I think he probably had a ghost helping him, but I was pleasantly surprised.

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    • Kevin Sheeran 31st March 2021 at 8:19 am

      I enjoyed Midge Ure’s autobiography ‘If I was…’ (named after a No 1 single of his!) but his is a very UK orientated tale – not sure how well known he was in the US, for example. He’s certainly been around the musical block though – in hit boy band (Slik) in the mid-70s, then the ‘Rich Kids’ (a very musical new wave band), then mega electronic bands Visage and Ultravox before being one half of the brains behind Band Aid with Bob Geldof. In between the above, he also toured as a guitarist with rock band Thin Lizzy and he’s written and produced with many other acts.

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    • Colin in Kent 31st March 2021 at 8:43 am

      There are two that I’d recommend (well, three, technically). The first is ‘Head On / Repossessed’ by Julian Cope, telling of the rise and fall of the Teardrop Explodes and his subsequent life, which I found fascinating, insightful and quite without ego. He’s gone on to become (apart from a musician), an icon of the pagan and archaeological community, and wrote ‘The Modern Antiquarian’, a seminal (and beautiful) guide to British stone circles, and a sequel about Europe.

      The second author is Andy Summers, who wrote ‘One Train Later’ about his life and career. It takes its title from the fact that, one day in the 70s, his music career ailing, he had a train to catch, and opted to get an earlier one than he intended. He got in a carriage opposite Stewart Copeland, and they got talking, and the latter told him about his band The Police, and that they’d just sacked their guitarist and were now wondering how they were going to record their first album. As Summers muses, if he’d got one train later, the meeting would never have taken place, and his life would have been entirely different. The autobiography opens and closes with Summers waiting to go on stage at Shea Stadium in 1983, knowing it was their last tour and Sting has told them he’s quitting, and the deep despair it plunges him into. It’s phenomenally well written, the prose the equal I’ve come across from either a musician or ‘proper’ writer. This, from the opening: ” My telecaster is lying in the corner, bathed in a patch of sunlight. The buttery rays strike the strings, and from them streams an incandescent glow, a lutescent aura, a Buddha smile from what might truly be called my most loyal friend.”

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    • Colin in Kent 31st March 2021 at 8:51 am

      I also enjoyed Bob Geldof’s ‘Is That It?’ I’m not really a fan of his music, but I found his brutal honesty quite refreshing, and his abusive childhood in Ireland simply and powerfully told. He’s also very insightful about Live Aid, and the difference between the UK and US stars. He is quite disparaging about the latter.

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    • SarahLou 31st March 2021 at 9:02 am

      Roger Daltrey’s autobiography is a good read.

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      • Fluff 31st March 2021 at 9:39 am

        Roger, Roger. 🙂

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        • Josie The Black Country Wench 3rd April 2021 at 12:14 pm

          Yeah I would recommend Roger Daltrey’s autobiography. And also Pete Townshend “Who I am” Two very different perspectives of what it was like to be a member of the who. I picked up Pete Townshend’s book in a charity shop and thought I will give that a go. Can be a bit harrowing in places, he is brutality honest about himself and his life.

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        • aspie auntie 8th April 2021 at 6:54 pm

          He’s talked about his grandma in relation to the story behind the ‘Tommy’ album on the ‘Classic Albums’ programme. Apparently his grandma was as poor a carer as Cousin Kevin and Uncle Ernie was supposed to be. By the way, I’m reading ‘Broken Greek’ by Pete Paphides, who’s not a rock star but a journalist and radio presenter. He mentions having had difficulties speaking when he was a child, possibly due to problems at school, but he gets to play pinball at his dad’s chip shop and beats the local champion. His parents were from Greece originally and went to Birmingham to work, and he has difficulties fitting in with the local schoolkids. His memories of particular 70s songs are really touching.

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        • Fluff 8th April 2021 at 8:20 pm

          So, ‘He’s a Pinball Wizard’ 🙂

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      • Lu Maxfield 2nd April 2021 at 4:50 am

        If his lyrical wish “Hope I die before I get old” had come true, there would either have been a very short book or no book at all 🙂

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      • kbrett114 3rd April 2021 at 12:34 pm

        I was at the same school as Roger tho at a different time but I remember the head teacher Mr Kibblewhite.

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    • Dreamyboy 31st March 2021 at 9:26 am

      I’ve only ever attempted one musical autobiography – it was the two lads from Status Quo, I thought they were such characters it would be a great read – unfortunately they admitted at the height of their fame they were so out of it on drugs for so many years they literally couldn’t remember any of it!

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    • Fluff 31st March 2021 at 9:38 am

      Yep, read the Rossi & Parfitt one as I used to be big fan during the mid’70’s.

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    • Shap Kendal 31st March 2021 at 10:06 am

      Roger Daltrey.

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    • Fluff 31st March 2021 at 10:07 am

      What is it that makes it ‘readable’, do you think?

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    • Kevin Sheeran 31st March 2021 at 10:46 am

      Two contributors have added a couple of good reads that I enjoyed, too, which are the books by Roger Daltrey and Bob Geldof. One other I would mention, is the autobiography by Lemmy of Motorhead, ‘White Line Fever.’ He’s a much funnier, intelligent and articulate bloke than most would give him credit for – plus his life could be fairly described as, er, colourful. And while I’m warming up to my subject, could I also recommend ‘The Rocker’ which is a biography of Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy, written with much love and respect but brutal honesty too. Good luck!

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      • aspie auntie 8th April 2021 at 6:59 pm

        I think I’ve read this or ‘My Boy’ by Philomena Lynott, Phil’s mother. I recall she at first brought the child home from hospital and had to lie to the neighbours that she’d adopted an African child, as at the time there weren’t many African or West Indian children in her neighbourhood. His dad was from Guyana.

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    • Fluff 31st March 2021 at 11:16 am

      Read them both, Kev & agree. Great reads. 🙂

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    • juleswalker 1st April 2021 at 3:57 pm

      I’m not a fan of any autobiography for the reason you suggest but I think the nature of autobiography is to do just that! You’re selling your life story.

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    • Fluff 1st April 2021 at 4:02 pm

      Fair play.

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    • Lu Maxfield 2nd April 2021 at 4:53 am

      A friend bought me “Keith”, Keith Richard’s autobiography, which sat on a shelf for a long time, but was surprisingly interesting. He DOES have a memory!

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    • Gill B 2nd April 2021 at 11:14 am

      I think my cousin would recommend Eric Clapton.

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    • Fluff 2nd April 2021 at 11:18 am

      Thanks Gill. For any reason in particular?

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    • MarianHaste 3rd April 2021 at 12:14 am

      Controversial thought: anyone who thinks enough of themselves to pen an autobiography must, by definition, be a bit up their own harris.

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      • Colin in Kent 3rd April 2021 at 12:04 pm

        I think there’s probably an inverse ratio at play – the younger you are when you believe you should write an autobiography, the more inflated your ego! And one of the earliest of autobiographies – ‘The Story of My Life’ by Giacomo Casanova – certainly proves your hypothesis!

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    • Fluff 3rd April 2021 at 8:55 am

      Could be a factor but, I suppose, that there are a number of other things that come into play?

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    • LindaMck 4th April 2021 at 7:15 am

      Ozzy Osbourne, brilliant

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    • Fluff 4th April 2021 at 9:16 am

      Where & when, Linda?

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    • aspie auntie 8th April 2021 at 7:23 pm

      I enjoyed Steve Hackett’s autobiography, ‘A Genesis In My Bed’. I got the impression that Phil Collins’s book ‘Not Dead Yet’ and Mike Rutherford’s ‘The Living Years’ book had spurred him into action to tell his side of the story.

      I liked his account of his early years, growing up in Pimlico with his little brother John. When Steve was a toddler, his mum would take him into town to do a bit of shopping and he’d get lost if his attention was taken by something in a shop window. I knew the feeling as I’d been the same with my auntie if she wanted to pop around Woolworth’s, say.

      He didn’t like school much and daydreamed a bit. I liked his telling of working in the fairground as a teenager – a bit like David Essex’s character Jim MacLaine in the film ‘That’ll Be The Day’, I thought! He left that after the person who’d shown him the ropes originally turned out to be a wrong ‘un.

      The Genesis years are well-documented and he initially saw joining the band as a breakthrough, but once he had success with his first solo album, Tony Banks didn’t want him to do any more solo stuff as part of the band. And so he quit.

      He skips through his solo career and problems with record labels and so on – I felt there could have been more on this.

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    • adeliza0165 11th April 2021 at 9:25 am

      Dave Gilmore?
      We briefly met him after the gig – very polite and humble guy.

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    • Fluff 11th April 2021 at 9:53 am

      Comes across as a very thoughtful/measured fella to me when I have seen him interviewed.

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    • Ems 15th April 2021 at 6:30 pm

      This is a call by dave grohl, written by him, (not ghost written) about himself and the foo fighters, definitely the nicest man in rock

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    • Vonny52 15th April 2021 at 7:48 pm

      Life by Keith Richards and Francis Rossi “I talk too much”.

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