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Deleted User Posted 10 months ago
Does anyone else feel that the solitary isolation imposed on people living alone, by the virus, has made them susceptible to feeling emotionally vulnerable very easily – to the smallest of triggers. And it’s quite a shock because you thought you were ok. I asked the sideboard but as usual, thick

as a plank!

Annella

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13 likes & 48 replies
    • Fluff 7th April 2021 at 6:46 pm

      Good point. I think, personally that this could possibly be true. I suppose that it may depend upon the sensitivity of the individual?

      Reply
    • loislane 7th April 2021 at 7:12 pm

      Definitely, I’m not the same person, I feel less confident, unsure of who I am now

      Reply
      • Deleted User 7th April 2021 at 8:22 pm

        Hello Loislane

        Yes thats just how it is. Small things change your world. Swing high, swing low emotions. Who is this person? We need a strategy-which hopefully we can discard very soon.

        I feel for you, and hope you bounce back to yourself quickly.

        Annella

        Reply
        • loislane 7th April 2021 at 8:44 pm

          Thanks, its anxiety mainly, not sleeping, started before, now worse, but I’m sure when normality comes again, we will either find ourselves or reinvent ourselves.🙂

          Reply
    • Deleted User 7th April 2021 at 9:05 pm

      Yes, like living on a landscape of piano keys I suppose You know you are resilient, thinking you have stepped on all the deepest keys and then you hit a new one and down you go again. And rise with a beautiful new sound.

      Loislane is always rescued by Superman. I love superheros.

      Annella

      Reply
    • Tonycar12 7th April 2021 at 10:45 pm

      Guys loads of people feelong anxiety and stress as well as isolation. I’m an NHS Link worker in West London and about to leave in 2 days due to anxiety and stress and need a break. You can self refer to NHS for counselling such as CBT which is useful for many people happy to advise thanks Tony

      Reply
    • SteV1Da 7th April 2021 at 10:53 pm

      Yes – Into an empty space things can enter in. At times they can command a disproportionate amount of importance. We have time to dwell on the negative and things which prompt fear in us. Because the future has been thrown into some disarray (even the “normal” and mundane things) and there is no firm foundation or dependable timetable to a return to life as we knew it this leaves such a gap – the fear creeps in. Before all of this I was tending to be “Billy no mates” in the last few years. Living alone & not involved in socialising I went into this part way there. Despite that I managed the first lockdown very well, the 2nd one ok BUT – since early January it has not been good. I’ve heard this from so many others that it does give me some comfort. In the early and late hours of the day, however, the isolation can sadly loom a bit larger.

      Reply
    • Deleted User 8th April 2021 at 12:00 am

      We are complex sociable animals and there might be deeply hidden problems that might affect us for years to come.
      I wonder how children growing up through this will be affected when you think of people going through therapy where a life long problem could have been caused by one small childhood memory, almost 2 years of suddenly not being allowed to do what you had got used to and being surrounded by people in masks might affect some badly.

      Reply
      • Deleted User 8th April 2021 at 1:11 am

        I think children are good at adapting but of course not all. My mother was shot at and had bombs dropped on her, as so many did in the war. But she had a strong family and perhaps that is the key.

        Annella

        Reply
        • Deleted User 8th April 2021 at 1:18 am

          True, my Aunty put my fathers paranoia down to Birmingham being bombed almost nightly in the war which lasted for 3 years from when he was 4.

          Reply
    • Deleted User 8th April 2021 at 2:31 am

      I found myself stroking my new fridge freezer the other day…

      Reply
    • Deleted User 8th April 2021 at 3:05 am

      Well it’s yours, with you and opens up to give you lovely things.

      Annella

      Reply
    • deb.boz 8th April 2021 at 7:49 am

      Yes, it’s boring and lonely 😞
      Thank goodness I’ve got a dog to walk, at least saying hello and smiling at people is better than sitting watching telly all day.

      Reply
    • Karen Rose 8th April 2021 at 8:59 am

      Yes can relate, can feel anxiety at moment even with lots of deep breathing- but my friends are feeling it too, talking to them made me feel I wasn’t the only one. At least Spring is here and we are moving towards summer and easing of restrictions- we have all been through a lot, hang in there, I am looking forward to some better times ahead. Can’t wait to go dancing again, and walk along a beach. Meanwhile still enjoy my outings to my fav parks and doing some outdoor walks and yoga. Learning a new thing Tai Chi – in St Andrews park in Bristol- it’s so calming- outdoors even in cold can wear our coats. I read on this website learning something new a good idea to keep spirits up, many thanks for sharing your thoughts and feelings 😊

      Reply
    • Janmay 8th April 2021 at 9:09 am

      I hadn’t thought about this but last weekend when we were allowed to meet family in gardens, I cried on the way home and felt very sad. I am not normally like this but seeing my son and lively daughter in law and playing with grandchildren was heaven, realised how much I had missed it all.

      Reply
    • Allexie 8th April 2021 at 10:33 am

      I’m having difficulty holding a conversation with anyone now. Have to really concentrate and think about how words and sentences are formed….really pathetic!!! Also have a great sense of doom when leaving the house – everything and everyone seems like a threat, what a ‘life’.

      Reply
      • Deleted User 8th April 2021 at 12:19 pm

        Yes this is something I can relate to too. So instead of feeling happy because you have been in company: agonising over what and how you may have said things takes its place! Lol Still betyer than talking to the sideboard and it will get better.

        Annella

        Reply
    • Deleted User 8th April 2021 at 12:24 pm

      I have been very surprised by the response to my post. But l hope being able to just get worries out of your head and into another space has helped you as much as me. And it seems a problem shared is a problem halved. Everyone is struggling somehow, but we have come this far, so we cant give up now and miss the new beginning party!!

      Reply
    • Karen Rose 8th April 2021 at 1:48 pm

      Much to my astonishment I cleaned the oven the other day, driven by boredom! Lol 😂

      Reply
    • Karen Rose 8th April 2021 at 1:52 pm

      Thanks for sharing Annella though, a sense of community and sharing what I need. 😊

      Reply
    • 🏴‍☠️ 9th April 2021 at 10:06 pm

      I think so, I know human connection is super important. I feel further away from relatives now, and it’s hard to reach out and talk to them – not necessarily offload, but things make a lot of sense when you talk to someone else, and always feel relieved when I do.

      Reply
    • Jilly Pilly 20th June 2021 at 12:58 pm

      I can relate to this far too well. I have a 20 year old daughter with bipolar and it’s been just us since she was 3. For several years prior to all the lockdowns, once it became obvious that she was troubled (she self harmed – nowadays she has tattoos instead – safe pain IYSWIM?), family and friends gave us a wide berth because she can be hard work (she can appear sullen and rude – it’s actually that she doesn’t quite know how to act around people – she’s aware that she thinks differently so goes quiet for fear of saying the wrong thing – her views on life and what people should think or say or not say, are very rigid and she can’t see that things aren’t always so cut and dried and people don’t always agree with her).
      When she’s ‘up’, she’s brilliant fun, but the lows are catastrophic.
      She was depressed for the entirety of last year, went to uni in October and came home for Christmas when explosive anger raised its head for the first time. She’s been offered help (it took years to obtain a diagnosis) but refuses to take meds as she’s researched and found out it makes you stable but numb and she doesn’t want to live like that, never really experiencing genuine emotions. I understand that, but, to say the least, it was quite frightening to be on the receiving end of all that anger. She’s just finished her first (unnatural) year at university where, apart from at Christmas, she was locked down in halls but is now back for the summer and I’m ashamed to say that I’m struggling. I’d relaxed, you see, while she was away and now I have to watch what I say or do again. I have zero support. The GP can’t offer anything apart from antidepressants because of covid. I need a support group for parents of bipolar children but the focus tends to be on the sufferers rather than those who love them and deal with the fallout.
      Ironically, I’m a trained laughter therapist and help others quite successfully. Laughter makes you feel better! However, probably because I’m her mum and have been the one fighting for help for her since she was in her early teens, she won’t accept any help from me and thinks it’s all mumbo jumbo.
      I’m at my wits end.
      Sorry all, that was probably far too much private information for a forum like this, but I feel a little better for having been honest about things. I don’t know what to do to turn my life around.

      Reply
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