Home Forums General Books that brought a tear to your eye?

Andy Paddles Posted 10 months ago
Books that brought a tear to your eye?

There seem to be a lot of book lovers on the forum, I was just wondering what people had read that brought a tear to their eye – a solitary tear drop rolling down your cheek or full on bawling with snot bubbles to boot!

For me:

The Road by Cormack Cathy – an exploration of hope when all seems hopeless! Not a book for a wet miserable Sunday!

Al Rouse – A Mountaineers Life – the biography of the first British climber to reach the summit of K2 – trapped in a storm he just never came back. Probably the first piece of writing to make my eyes wet!

And finally – The Shepherd’s Crown by Terry Pratchett. The usual clever, funny and uplifting read, but his last novel before his death – felt like the end of an era!

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5 likes & 218 replies
    • Deleted User 14th April 2021 at 8:26 am

      A really interesting thread. I read tons but as my user name suggests..am pretty clueless at remembering any plot I’ve read. But this has got me thinking 😀

      Reply
      • Andy Paddles 14th April 2021 at 8:38 am

        I’m sure we can all be clueless Clueless! Sometimes, just sit back and enjoy! 😉

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      • SJH 15th April 2021 at 10:37 pm

        This is me! I’ve read so many books, but forgot authors and book titles etc. The Tatooist was emotional and a few others about 2nd world war concentration camps. Many tears from those.

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    • Deleted User 14th April 2021 at 10:04 am

      😅 Thanks Andy

      Reply
    • rutherford.jimmy 15th April 2021 at 7:10 pm

      Saddo i am it has to be Marley and me

      Reply
    • Deleted User 15th April 2021 at 7:13 pm

      some of the classics have definitely brought tears to my eyes A Tale of Two Cities, Jayne Eyre, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, The Bell Jar, Modern books such as Me Before You, The Shepherds Hut and most recently one of my daughters books “All the Bright Places. Looking at the list I’m thinking I’m a bit of a cry baby!

      Reply
    • Vaulsy 15th April 2021 at 7:36 pm

      I’m currently finishing a Children’s Literature module for an Open University degree and had to read this year’s Carnegie Medal winner, Lark, by Anthony McGowan. It’s a short book, easily read in one sitting & is published by Barrington Stokes who specialise in publications for children with dislexia & reading difficulties. It’s a young adult book but wow it packs an emotional punch! I absolutely blubbed when I read it as did nearly everyone else on the course. Definitely need lots of tissues

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    • hazelbrowne11 15th April 2021 at 7:41 pm

      A man called Ove and all of the books by Fredrik Backman. He’s an absolutely wonderful writer and I have a tear each book.

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    • Vonny52 15th April 2021 at 7:44 pm

      Erebus by Michael Palin. The heart wrenching story of the ship that tried to find it’s way through the North West Passage. Michael’s research is very comprehensive and the story is very moving.
      Also Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee.

      Reply
    • Liffy 15th April 2021 at 7:55 pm

      having had a think The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini helped me understand the problems of Afganistan , also Small Island by Andrea Levy. I cried in the beginning middle and end. A book about the dreadful racism faced by the West Indians who came to UK after the war

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      • Chrissie of the island 15th April 2021 at 9:12 pm

        Have you read A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini?

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        • Liffy 15th April 2021 at 9:31 pm

          yes , indeed. When I find an author I try to get everything they write.

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        • Chellsy 15th April 2021 at 9:47 pm

          I have been scrolling down this thread to see if someone would mention A Thousand Splendid Suns. It is without doubt the saddest book I have ever read and I cried for ages afterwards. Just watching the news tonight and seeing the interview with the Taliban just makes me want to weep all over again for the people of Afghanistan. Khaled Hosseini is a fantastic writer, And The Mountains Echoed is also a very moving book. Think Splendid Suns should be compulsory reading for all Secondary school students.

          Reply
      • Deleted User 16th April 2021 at 2:01 pm

        A thousand splendid suns. Wonderful

        Reply
    • karsteele 15th April 2021 at 8:16 pm

      Looking at all the posts on this page, I’m thinking it is impossible to have a favourite book. A favourite book in a particular genre OK. But my god there are so many brilliant books out there it seems wrong to put them in a list.

      Reply
    • VLB 15th April 2021 at 8:55 pm

      One Day by David Nicholls and The Time Traveller’s Wife. I think I am just a romantic at heart.

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    • Chrissie of the island 15th April 2021 at 9:13 pm

      I agree with One Day, a real tearjerker

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    • Chellsy 15th April 2021 at 9:30 pm

      Couldn’t agree more about The Shepherd’s Crown. I most certainly do not have an ’emotional response’ type personality but can’t bring myself to open the book as it will be the last book of his that I haven’t yet read and it’s just too sad.

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      • Andy Paddles 15th April 2021 at 10:16 pm

        Just do it Chellsy! You won’t be disappointed – like all good Pratchett tales Tiffany has grown and evolved! A great read! Time to move on! 🥺

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        • Chellsy 15th April 2021 at 10:33 pm

          Thanks Andy, you’re probably right. For one reason or another I am having to move on in life this year. It’s going well, I’ve just bought my first campervan and I’m picking it up this weekend and have planned my first weekend away next weekend. I’ve been holding on to A Horseman Riding By, R F Delderfield, to read on my van adventures but starting with The Shepherd’s Crown might be quite fitting.

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        • Andy Paddles 15th April 2021 at 11:50 pm

          Have a great adventure Chellsy – campervans are so high on the wish list of all the best people – happ travels!

          Don’t forget to pack a cast iron frying pan – there are no demons that you can’t beat down with that!

          Happy travelling!

          Reply
    • Beanoak 15th April 2021 at 10:02 pm

      The Grapes of Wrath is heartbreaking. But Old Yeller is the first book I can remember crying over.

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    • melayahm 16th April 2021 at 6:59 am

      Stephen King’s The Dead Zone (yes, really), and The Time Traveller’s Wife

      Reply
    • Gary K 16th April 2021 at 8:03 am

      Red Clocks – Leni Zumas
      Grapes of Wrath – Steinbeck
      Where the Forest meets the Stars – Glendy Vanderah
      The Woman in the White Kimono – Ana Johns
      The Return – Victoria Hislop
      Any of the first two Trilogies in The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever – Stephen Donaldson.

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      • Andy Paddles 16th April 2021 at 1:15 pm

        Where the forest meets the stars was the title that captured my attention – that looks like a right good read!

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        • Gary K 16th April 2021 at 1:41 pm

          It is, and I think as a debut book she’s one to keep an eye on for future titles.
          The other one I thought of was A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson. Its one of very few books that made me belly laugh out loud (on a plane embarrassingly), and a couple of the passages had me crying with laughter.

          Reply
    • Deleted User 16th April 2021 at 8:53 am

      All the light we cannot see
      Anthony doerr
      Wonderful

      Reply
    • Anna B 16th April 2021 at 9:58 am

      What a GREAT thread! It sent me onto Amazon to spend a load of money (never could go into a bookshop and walk out without something!)

      The House of The Spirits – Isabel Allende (which I read 30 years ago) was very memorable; a multi faceted story, wonderfully drawn characters of a family saga set in a time of terrible political turmoil. I also loved her more recent book, The Japanese Lover.

      All the Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr was a fabulous read.

      Reply
    • Deleted User 16th April 2021 at 2:03 pm

      My brilliant friend! Also enjoyed the tv edition

      Reply
    • Deleted User 16th April 2021 at 2:05 pm

      Shuggie Bain
      Scabby Queen
      Both funny and harrowing. But splendid reads

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    • Gill B 17th April 2021 at 9:51 am

      I always thought Terry Pratchett was a children’s writer .. clearly wrong, or maybe you also read kids books .. I mean Harry Potter didn’t escape me either!

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      • Andy Paddles 17th April 2021 at 10:03 am

        No TP was for the most part a writer of adult fantasy fiction – although he did write a number of books for children, and latterly some young adult fiction set within the same fantasy world as his adult novels – clever!

        On the surface his stories appeared to be the usual comedy fantasy fiction – however there’s depth and subtle exploration of real world issues! The book jackets have always had a cartoonish quality to them (josh kirby and Paul Kidby were the artists who illustrated his work) – never judge a book by its cover could not be truer in TPs case!

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        • Gill B 17th April 2021 at 10:10 am

          Thanks .. Maybe I will succomb to something different. I used to belong to a book club, and that was a great concept to have me reading genres I wouldn’t dream of reading .. I have always stuck to detective/spy/adventure novels .. I had to wean myself off Stephen King when in my early 20s, way too scary – and I decided it wasn’t doing me any good!!!

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    • Deleted User 18th April 2021 at 1:07 am

      Tom Sharp, Porterhouse Blue.

      Annella

      Reply
    • Fuff 18th April 2021 at 2:04 pm

      A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson – a very unexpected ending that had me in tears. I got so attached to Ted the main character. Life after Life by the same author is also a great read!

      Reply
    • Rosemary 26th April 2021 at 5:13 pm

      I’ve recently read Nomadland, which is non-fiction and now the film has won all those awards. I haven’t seen the film but the stories in the book are heartbreaking. It seemed like a latterday Grapes of Wrath.

      Reply
    • Debskidoo Carmarthenshire 5th May 2021 at 8:25 pm

      Memoirs of a Geisha
      The Kite Runner
      I know why the Caged Bird Sings
      The Gargoyle
      The Color Purple
      Sunset Song

      and many many more ….. thanks for your suggestions

      Reply
    • Lisa D 5th May 2021 at 9:05 pm

      The Island by Victoria Hislop

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    • Gill B 18th May 2021 at 8:08 pm

      Are you leading the stats Andy P?🤣

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      • Andy Paddles 18th May 2021 at 8:24 pm

        I don’t think so Gill, I suspect it’s probably Carol! And there’s a few other contenders in the race at the moment!

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        • Gill B 18th May 2021 at 8:30 pm

          Ahhhh so you have been keeping your eye on the stats!! I thought you had a large number of followers though … so are you checking those figures too? There are a few contenders .. and some prolific posters lately!

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        • Andy Paddles 18th May 2021 at 10:12 pm

          No Gill, I’ll admit to geek quite happily, I draw the line at Anorak! 😳😮

          Reply
    • CAAS 18th May 2021 at 9:22 pm

      Tears of Laughter, does that count.? If Yes, then Spike Milligan’s WAR MEMOIRS. Brilliantly Funny

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    • Deleted User 19th May 2021 at 8:30 am

      Andy, I think you should write a book! Your threads are always hilarious.

      Reply
      • Andy Paddles 19th May 2021 at 9:17 am

        That’s very kind Margaret – I’ll give it some thought! I’m sure I heard or read somewhere that we all have at least one book in us! 😁

        Reply
    • Fluffy 19th May 2021 at 9:18 am

      War and Peace – i dropped it on my foot 😀

      Reply
    • TmonT 19th May 2021 at 5:14 pm

      The karma sutra ouch but I don’t think it’s for the reasons you meant My back still knackered 🙄

      Reply
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