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  • Any tips for frugal living?

    We received some really useful feedback on our article on ways to cut costs and are thinking about running a follow-up piece with money-saving tips from our community members. Do you have any tips for frugal living which you think could benefit others? We’d love to hear from you!

    Posted by mel
    • Reply by aislinggray

      A family member is an avid money saver and has the following tips:

      -Shop early morning/late evening when sell by dates mean prices are halved or more.  Nearly everything can be frozen so cook and freeze excess or just freeze until needed.

      -Baking soda, vinegar and lemons can be used in different ways to clean almost anything and are much cheaper – and better for the environment – than factory made cleaning products

      -An extra sweater is much cheaper than turning up the heating

      -Don’t diss pound shops – there can be awesome bargains on well known quality brands

      -Get your needle and thread out and MEND rather than shopping new

      • Reply by Amanda in Durham

        I’ve picked up some great bargains at Tesco’s by accidentally being there around 5-6pm and found stuff in the sell-by chilled unit.

        The other week I got a load of organic lamb mince for only two quid a pack, took it all home and froze it. I used it later to make kofta with mint, they were delicious!

        • Reply by mel

          Excellent tip – there are often lots of bargains to be found in the ‘yellow sticker’ section.

        • Reply by Lainey

          Yes this is a good time to pick up great bargains. Saves loads of money.

          Amanda what is your kofta recipe that sounds delish !!

        • Reply by Amanda in Durham

          I found it online, I will look for it later!

        • Reply by Amanda in Durham

          https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/lamb-koftas

        • Reply by Amanda in Durham

          Hi Lainey,

          I just noticed that the kofta recipe doesn’t include any salt. I would normally always add 5g/1tsp of salt to a recipe like this and forgot to do so the first time I made these and they were way too bland without the salt.

          The second time I added the salt and it made a world of difference!

    • Reply by mel

      Great tips! You’ve reminded me I’ve got a mountain of buttons to sew on….

       

    • Reply by Lainey

      Depending on the size of your family – you could look at maybe buying the larger sizes of household items and share with family rather than buy the smaller size just for yourself.  for example : toilet rolls – it’s cheaper to buy a larger size and share out than keep buying the little packs of 4…. back in March we got hold of a 32 pack of the Nicky brand in Sainsburys and it was £10 . It didn’t get opened until May…

      One pot casseroles are good and quick and you can add what you want or have in.  Have a good ‘larder’ cupboard of essentials  (pulses, beans,tins to add to them to jazz them up a bit) . We did chilli the other week and instead of baked beans we used cannelloni beans, very nice too !!

      If you are a baker, whizz up some pastry and make a pie… even beans and sausages makes a nice pie with cheese mixed in… It’s a meal if you add some veg.

      When freezing food, instead of buying plastic containers, we use the Flora tubs (the 500g size) these are a nice ‘one’ portion size for defrosting.

      My sister whizzes in her food mixer a big piece of cheese and portions it out into little food bags for the freezer. It prevents waste of cheese sitting in a fridge. When you use it from the freezer, it is still loose and you just sprinkle it onto your bread – makes the quickest cheese on toast…

      My daughter had a clear out of her clothes recently and had a bag for the charity shop. I rummaged through and took the leggings, they were fine and I like them for lounging in the house or even sleeping in…. saves me buying new ones.

      If you use washing powder,I suggest looking at the large XXL boxes as they usually work out cheaper than the small boxes.

      Don’t use Calgon for cleaning the washing machine – baking soda is great and cheaper..

      • Reply by Gill B

        I love all these ideas Lainey

        • Reply by Lainey

          You are welcome Gill – we are all here to help one another and in such times as prices are rising everywhere and the job market is fragile too it does pay to try and be as careful as possible .

        • Reply by Gill B

          I agree.

          I have been fortunate to not have had to watch the pennies (in a previous life it seems), but a year into my husband’s retirement I discovered he was overdrawn and it transpired it was dementia setting in. I just took over the finances and got us back on track. I set up a new joint account, put £50 in it, gave him a cash card so that he could withdraw cash. Thank goodness for on line banking to keep an eye on things. He rarely used it actually, but was always mithering about his wallet and having money in it right up until a few months before he passed away.

        • Reply by Lainey

          Hi Gill,

          I am sorry to hear of the loss of your husband and that he suffered from the cruel condition of dementia.

          Take care

        • Reply by Gill B

          The dementia journey was not one I would choose to repeat, although I certainly have the skills and knowledge now. It was a blessing when he went and boy am I glad he is not going through covid with me. He was a very dear man but it was his time to go. Much loved and many happy memories.

        • Reply by susieE

          That a good idea to help maintain some feeling of control over money – just a caution though – my father was my mothers carer and when he became too ill to care for her she need to go into a care home for a while – he had taken control of all the money as she had some dementia – he had not formally done it just didn’t let her have a bank card etc. Social services accussed him of financial abuse as my mother in her demented state told the care home that he never let her have any money (that was totally untrue of course). but it took a lot of effort to get them to see. If there is an issue with incapacity its best to inform the bank so you will not get wrongly accused too.

        • Reply by Gill B

          That was such a difficult thing to deal with. It is a mine field. I had no problem though. All bank accounts were joint. He always had some money in his wallet. In the end the only cards he had in his wallet were out of date (in case he lost his wallet or it was taken from him). The local authority had no involvement at all – in case they refused to do a needs assessment because we were self funding. I couldn’t be asked to argue with them. It wasn’t all too exhausting. He did pass away 18 months ago – but it was a long journey.

      • Reply by Marica

        Brilliant , Lainey! I love the idea of margarine tubs of the freezer

    • Reply by capri888

      Use up all your food by being imaginative with your cooking.  Always compare prices for insurances and utilities. Cashback sites when buying goods and services. Use Tesco Points for things other than spending at Tesco as the value is tripled usually. Switch Current accounts for incentives such as 125.00 cash! Buy a refurbished mobile outright then a great SIM only deal. ALways compare with any deals though just in case…. sell by dates; these are a guide, use your common sense and your nose etc. I frequently use items past sell by date. Example fresh pasta, eggs, houmous. I freeze my bread and defrost before I need it or if having toast no need to defrost. Buy Larger packs of toilet tissue and laundry items. Buy loose veg rather than pre packed. Frozen raspberries rather than fresh. There are some great incentives for credit cards if you spend a certain amount in first few months.  ALways pay off in full each month. Even when working at home I do not switch on heating during day but have thick socks and jumper with layers underneath.

      I could go on but I do not wish to bore you

      • Reply by Lainey

        Hi Marina,

        Love your feedback!  My renewal came up last week for the internet, landline and I was with Virgin Media. I retained the deal of £36 per month for 2020 that I had initially in 2019 after haggling with the advisor. However, this time I wanted to take the TV element off, it was only for hubbie as I don’t watch much tv, and I was astounded at what the advisor said to me. She said it’s tricky to take parts of your package away and she said I was best leaving it on !! I said no I won’t be doing and then purported to ask her for her best deal for broadband and line only. She said she could not do any better than what I was on. I asked if they could do £30 and she said no.  She also said they have extended their contracts back to 18 months from the 12 months I had been on.

        I cancelled the subscription as my 30 days notice started that day and I went on http://www.uswitch.com and Martin Lewis website …moneysavingexpert.com  and we looked at Plusnet and they wanted an install fee of £49.99. Then we saw BT offering a good deal albeit is is for 2 years . We got £31.99 but the first 3 months are free. We are getting 2 new handsets, and also Britbox free for 6 months. Then there is a £100 High street shopping card too. It does pay to shop around.  An advisor rang today and wanted to discuss my cancellation, (think Martin Lewis calls them the customer retention Dept ?) and he said he would see what he could do for me. I said no need luv, it is cancelled and will stop on the 19th Dec. I did not tell him the name of my new provider. I thanked him for his time and said tara.

        I am stopping using a mobile contract with Tesco. I have had handsets for 6 years, not dear ones but still cost more in the long run don’t they? I am going to see what deals are there for SIM only deals. I do like a bargain…

        • Reply by capri888

          Fantastic, money saving expert is also a go- to for me. I used them for gas and electric as they have a comparison tool . I paid for sky for years but never haggled which you should do but i felt they had me over a barrel as no virgin where I am. My daughter looking into a phone contract and I may ask her to check with virgin as I believe her internet is with them . Fantastic if they do not bring their price down you can always go elsewhere! You did great Lainey. I don’t pay for sky now just use my daughters Netflix and amazon and free to view channels and pay a tv licence so can watch live bbc

        • Reply by Scots Lass

          Hi Marina
          I bought my own phone and took out a Giff Gaff SIM only deal which costs me £8 a month. Sometimes I pay £6. You can control and amend your plan each month easily on line as you get a usage statement. You are not tied into a contract either. Best decision I ever made coming out of a contract.

        • Reply by Lainey

          Hi
          Yeah my Tesco contract finishes in a few months – is it worth settling it off now or waiting for it to finish?
          I am going with Giff Gaff on a SIM only deal. I am keeping the Samsung A7 phone from the Tesco contract I have as it’s still enough for me on the functionality aspect etc.

          My daughter has left Tesco now, settled contract and is happy with the SIM deal with GiffGaff. She has bought a phone outright now. No more mobile contracts in this household.

      • Reply by LeighS

        Hello Marina

        I use my Tesco club card points to pay for my Tesco mobile bill. I think if I have earned something like £10 in points it is doubled if I use it to pay for my mobile. I do my grocery shopping at Tesco so I do get a reasonable amount of points, which when converted do help towards paying my mobile bill.

        Glad I am not the only one who frequently uses things past the sell by date and also doesn’t switch the heat on during the day. I also work at home wear plenty of layers, thermal tights and socks work. Does keep my heating bills down 🙂

         

        • Reply by capri888

          Hi there, Yes you are not alone.  Good tip about the Mobile bill did not know you could do that!

          I must admit I do not feel the cold much yet so no thermals yet!

        • Reply by mel

          I try to keep the heating off during the day too, although it’s looking pretty chilly later this week. We didn’t have central heating growing up, so my father would make us tie hot water bottles to ourselves with belts to keep us warm and stop us complaining about the cold!

        • Reply by Gill B

          I have a friend who takes advantage of all nectar points, shops at sainsburys with his Tesco Visa card (or maybe its a mastercard I’m not sure – he pays that off anyway) .. so gets tesco and nectar points. Buys his fuel from Sainsburys .. and takes advantage of all the offers for both tesco and nectar cardholders that he can (although I only buy what I really really need) … and as he says, sometimes the amount he gets in points is worth more than the tins of tomatoes he buys!!! By christmas he has £100s worth of points on both cards, and it pays for many of his presents – buying clothes as gifts!

        • Reply by susieE

          Ive also found that if I use my Tesco credit card in another supermarket I seem to get a lot of coupons for Tesco – and I am thinking of doing the same with a Sainsbury credit card. The points soon add up and its worth looking at the deals – got a eurotunnel ticket that has already been changed twice due to the pandemic but we will get to France for free soon I hope.

      • Reply by Amanda in Durham

        Please do go on!

      • Reply by Gill B

        I love all your suggestions …

    • Reply by LeighS

      Whilst I don’t have any direct tips I have noticed that since we went into the first lockdown I have become more frugal. This was because there were items that were difficult to get. Rather than put crusts of bread out for the birds we ate them. I also cut down on the amount sugar that was used. I made stock out of vegetable peelings and also cut down on the amount of meat that I was cooking, used more vegetables instead.

    • Reply by Brighton Belle

      Become vegetarian much healthier

      • Reply by Gill B

        it is .. although you can just significantly reduce the meat quantity. Some people eat way too much protein.. fill the plate with veg and not meat …. but some delicious veggie meals! I am not dedicated to meat at all .. and I often choose veggie in a restaurant (back in the day)…

    • Reply by ArtyFartyAngie

      I approached a local land owner who owns a paddock next to my house.

      He agreed that in return for me mowing it and keeping it tidy, I could grow veggies, and put a greenhouse and shed on it. It already has 3 apple and 3 pear trees which I made good use of. I’ve grown fruit and veg and preserved jars and jars of different jams and pickles. I had a glut of courgettes and marrows – who knew you could make lemon curd with marrows!! And my favourite has been Lemon, ginger and courgette jam. Its been great fun looking up recipes and trying them. I’ve made loads of jam from foraging too: Plum, damson, greengage, blackberry and my latest is rosehip. I’ve also made all of the above with apple and pears added to make a lighter tasting version. It’s all delicious! It’s also great fillings and toppings for deserts. I’ll be picking some more rosehips to make Rosehip Syrup which has massive amounts of vit c, so fantastic for winter. All the fruit has been freely available, I just needed to buy sugar and the odd lemon. I love my newfound frugal cupboard fillers. There are loads of fungi growing in the local orchards too, but I don’t know enough about them to risk eating them.

      Ohh, and I’ve made apple scrap cider vinegar too! When I made the jam I saved the apple skins and cores, added water and sugar and left it to sit for a month. Stirred it occasionally, filtered it through muslin, and now have home made apple cider vinegar. Smells great! And I’ve made my own compost with my scraps so will save money next year.

      • Reply by Gill B

        Wow.. that was a good move.. need to live next to a field or nearby .. but well done. All sounds delicious!

      • Reply by capri888

        Brilliant Ange, Skillshare is a thing and how cool that you can do that

    • Reply by Anonymous User

      I make stock from chicken carcase in my slow cooker to use up in soup etc

      • Reply by mel

        Great idea – we do this too, it always comes in very handy having some stock in the freezer.

    • Reply by Anonymous User

      Don’t get married

      • Reply by Gill B

        What? Do the men drain your funds 🙂

    • Reply by Anonymous User

      I’ve always been of the mindset ‘If you can’t afford it, don’t buy it’ I’ve always managed to save money, no matter how small, lose change in a jar soon adds up. I shop around for bargains, check comparison websites for the best car insurance, utility bills etc. Have never been in debt even when I was made redundant in 1992 and had a mortgage, I’d just sold my flat and bought a 2 bed house so rented out the 2nd bedroom for added income!

      • Reply by Gill B

        … and tax relief for having a lodger (if indeed you are a tax payer)… great idea

        • Reply by capri888

          Yes, I do this too. The people I meet are usually very nice and if not we both usually agree and they find another place. I have made a great friend by sharing this year and even though she is leaving now we will stay friends. The Tax free is definitely an incentive. Great money earner and although I do not manage to save it I use it as a rainy day fund and keep it separately!

    • Reply by VFP

      To save on heating bills I wear a heated vest, which has a battery, at home during the day. I also wear it when I walk the dog on cold days. I have two batteries so when one battery runs out I switch to the other.

      • Reply by Gill B

        Wow.. I haven’t heard of one of those before Viv.. what a great idea!

        • Reply by VFP

          Thanks, my sister, in Cape Breton Island (Nova Scotia) told me about them a few years ago. It gets really cold there!

      • Reply by Lainey

        Hi Viv
        Where can you purchase these vests please? It sounds great.

        • Reply by VFP

          Mine is made by Conqueco in China (I think) and I got it from Amazon. There are a number of brands there, and you can get a gilet (like me) or a whole jacket. When I ordered an extra rechargeable battery it said ‘heated socks’ on the label, but it was just warm socks and the extra battery.

        • Reply by Gill B

          lol.. its amazing what we can get on Amazon! Mind you a friend had fluffy balls delivered instead of a much wanted book yesterday. Mistakes happen!

      • Reply by Somethingshort

        I’ve got one of those blankets Viv. I had it for my 99 year old Mum….she loved it. It was so versatile too – it could be used off the car lighter in the car. When you’re 99 years old you really feel the cold and she was so tiny and think so we just wanted to wrap her up in warm cotton wool most of the time – which is just how this blanket was.

        • Reply by VFP

          That’s a perfect gift! I’m not 99 but I really feel the cold. My GP blames it on my mum, who kept the central heating high when I was growing up. Despite having braved Canadian winters, my body thermostat is set for tropical weather 😧.

        • Reply by Somethingshort

          That doesn’t bode well for me does it. My Mum was always cold. I find that moving about is the best thing. I never sit still. But yes, we have the heating on AND the woodburner most days. The cats seem to pass out with the heat.

        • Reply by VFP

          It sounds lovely in your house 🙂

    • Reply by Pete the beeman

      If you have a wood burner then use it to cook on. We put a protective piece of kitchen foll under the pot and it just sits and simmers away. Lovely one pot meals for free. YOu can also get toasting forks for the stove and again free toast. Free as in no power used other than what is being used anyway. (for the nit pickers..lol)

      • Reply by Somethingshort

        That’s a brilliant idea Pete. Yes, I should. I tend to use several things in the kitchen. Of course, the slow cooker comes into its own, and I love that smell when I go out for a walk and come back into the house, but I have a Remoska which I love too. It cooks the best roast potatoes.

      • Reply by susieE

        yes ive done this – my daughter used to love it when she was young too

    • Reply by Pete the beeman

      Just keep in mind that Martin Lewis sold off his site and so it’s not quite as independent than it was… double check. Use Duckduckgo instead of Google. 😉

      https://duckduckgo.com/install

      There’s no need to waste veg or meat left overs that is what the soup pan is for.

      Before you buy it ask if you need it?

      • Reply by capri888

        Good to know , when did he do this? I had no idea

    • Reply by Gill B

      Shop weekly if you can

      Shop from a shopping list only, and buy absolutely nothing else If its not on the list you don’t need it today.

      For each item on your list, ask two questions:
      – Is it an absolute need (if its a like to have or must have but you don’t NEED it), don’t buy it;
      – Can I manage without this absolutely essential item until my next shop? Do I have enough left to keep me going for another week/until my next shop? If you do c/f to the following week’s list.

      Don’t bother keeping a spare – its so easy to forget you already have one in the cupboard, and end up buying a second and third one.

      Take time (and pair of glasses) to read the unit price in the supermarket. Sometimes the bargains are on the bottom or top of the shelf. Decide whether you really have to be loyal to the brand. The stores own brands are not always the cheapest either .. so still check the unit price.

      During lock down I have been shopping for a friend who is very much watching the pennies and looking out for bargains. He even goes on the internet to check any offers before he adds it to his list. As a result, I started to shop in Aldis for fruit and veg and found it so much cheaper but of the same quality as other supermarkets. I can’t get everything in Aldis (apparently Lidls and Iceland is similar pricing), so I still do Sainsburys, but my shopping bill has drastically reduced.

      I have literally just switched energy supplier and it has saved me £30 a month… Uswitch was particularly easy to use, but have your current energy bill to hand so that you know your consumption for the last year and what tariff you are on… I feel rather pleased with myself.

      • Reply by Somethingshort

        I was talking to someone the other day Gill……about recipe books and these boxes you can have delivered (whooooo expensive….don’t go there) but there isn’t one cookery book on the market that gives you a shopping list from week to week. Wouldn’t that be a fantastic thing to shop for your cupboard as well as recipes with the idea in mind that everything (or almost everything gets used). Have you ever bought a spice for a recipe and found it unused in the cupboard six years later (well…you know…..) But then that falls over because some weeks there are better deals than others on certain foods.

        • Reply by Gill B

          I know those boxes are expensive. I have never tried them. It would be interested to have someone else do your grocery shop and then have to sort out what and how you are going to cook it!!!

          I have chucked so many things that I only use once. I don’t get through then quickly enough. At the moment I have a couple of doubles too!!!

        • Reply by Somethingshort

          Wouldn’t it. I rather enjoy it when I’m “eating the cupboard” or “eating the fridge” because sometimes it’s the frugality that makes me think more of what is there to eat/what can I make. I eat simply. I used to enjoy veg boxes. You never knew what was coming and that in itself was exciting. We are literally spoilt for choice these days.

    • Reply by Lainey

      Well I got a bargain yesterday – its not on the theme of frugality in terms of food but in regards to a Kindle subscription. I cancelled mine last year and when I was on furlough around June I looked at my Amazon account again and noticed they were offering me ‘free’ 4 months of Kindle unlimited – so I signed up. Therefore the £7.99 fee would not kick in until end of Oct. I noted it in my diary that I would not be signing up for it in Oct as I then wanted to still be careful with spends.

      Well, yesterday I was on Amazon and had another look at the Kindle account. Guess what ? Amazon were offering £7.99 for 3 months – so that will take me to 15th April and it works out as £2.66 a month, or 66.5p or week or 9.5p per day. That is not bad at all so I signed up again. I told hubbie and I said ‘you know it DOES pay to cancel your Kindle subscription now and again as Amazon then send you offers.
      So to sum up I have not done so bad with my Kindle membership from June – free from June to Oct then under 10p per day from mid Jan to mid April. That is a saving and I can have a good read !!

    • Reply by Scots Lass

      We’ve invested in 2 things this year to help save money. A chest freezer for the garage so we can buy and cook in bulk and freeze any deals we see in the supermarket. The 2nd item is a Soda Stream which I found in Curry’s for £66 less than the usual price. I was fed up with my husband buying small bottles of fizzy water while he was out working, so now we make our own fizzy water and save money and keep the plastic waste down.

    • Reply by Anonymous User

      Instead of buying potatoes and carrots at the supermarket go to a local farm where you can buy a huge sack of veg for a fiver. They taste so much better too.

    • Reply by Somethingshort

      Oh and definitely, this goes without saying. Get your own bottle of water from the TAP. I hate buying bottled water these days and have bought myself this super insulated stainless steel water bottle. I love it. It also means that if I pop in a couple of ice cubes (or lemon/grape ice cubes out of the freezer) I get ice cold water when everyone around me is drinking their lukewarm water. On a hot day this comes into its own.

    • Reply by Somethingshort

      I hate using the tumble drier. It’s the worst energy eater. I do like hanging stuff in the fresh air, but every day we have at least two damp bath towels, if not more. A pet hate, just drying the damn things. However, not any more…..use a flannel to mop every morsel of water off yourself after a shower THEN get your towel. No more do we have wet towels hanging around the house. It’s wonderful. (I’m also in the Telegraph book of Hints and Tips with that one – page 119 – ooh published I am!) Something else that is happening in old (say it quick) age. I am becoming (hang on let me straighten my halo) SO TIDY. What is happening. Is it the lockdown? Is it me. I’ve never been Miss Tidy in a lifetime. Spotless, yes. But Tidy – no. Now I open my knicker drawer and there are all my pants rolled into colours and matching rolls of socks and bras – all in mushroom boxes (the big ones you throw away from the supermarket – well they are big pants). My tea towel drawer is the same…..My towels in the bathroom are now being rolled (rolling is the way to go – according to Marie Kondo). Yes, I’ve been Marie Kondo-ed. Anyone else? I’m beginning to think I want to tidy the world too.

    • Reply by lyndabrownbath

      Yes. Never waste money on Ready Meals. They are bad for your health and pocket. Start cooking from scratch and there are loads of lovely cheap meals can be made.

      • Reply by Somethingshort

        Yes, of course Lynda. Goes without saying. Although…….I would murder for a take away curry all the way from the Balti Triangle in Birmingham! I used to love cooking, especially when I had people to cook for, but now I don’t. I find it really difficult to be inspired by food. Nobody ever buys me a cook book for Christmas or birthdays either, which I find odd. I’d love one. Consequently we have the simplest of meals at home now. When my Mum was alive I got used to mashed this and mashed that….and gravy with everything or soups – anything that went through false teeth easily. By the time lunch time or supper time came around I was too dead beat to cook anything inspiring. I think I’ve just lost my zizz a bit……it’ll come back. I hope. I need people to cook for! People who love to sit and drink and eat around a table……people who enjoy a nice glass of wine and lots of chatter. I’ll hop over to France when all this is over and go and get myself lost somewhere.

    • Reply by Pete the bee man

      When we ran the guest house, slept 21, we had a pile of towels to deal with. They were washed then spun in a stand alone spinner, 2800 RPM and after that hung up in the boiler room over a hanger with a dehumidifier running on constant. The next morning they were dry and then got a five minute fluff up in the tumble dryer before going to the rooms. The critical bit here though is the spinner, they cost now about £120 but my goodness they get the water out. They are after all running at 2x the 1400 of many washer spins. 😉

    • Reply by Dollycon

      I never by new clothes except for underwear. The vast majority of my clothes are more than 7 years old-pre retirement or from charity shops. Shoes are new but I buy quality in the sales.

    • Reply by mel

      Some really brilliant ideas here! Thank you all so much. I’ll be updating out frugal living ideas article and will definitely be including lots of these, so do keep an eye out for it!

    • Reply by siandeve15

      If you want to save some serious money consider buying a chest freezer.
      I’ve done a little research into average prices eg.
      The average cost of a smallish chest freezer 85 x 54 x 55cm from Curry’s £129
      The average cost of a larger chest freezer 85 x 80 x 55cm from Curry’s £199
      The average cost of electricity to run a Fridge freezer per year is £23.50
      Upright Freezer cost of running is £62
      The chest freezer for both sizes is £47,50 running cost.

      In the run-up to any big holiday eg Easter or Christmas etc all the big supermarkets fall over themselves to offer you all manner of one of the bargains.
      For Eg Every year the bigger Tesco has a pro-mo of half-price Legs of Lamb, Beef Joints, & Pork Joints this goes on for one month before Xmas.
      Ok, you’ve got to have the freezer space & the money to take advantage of these promos.
      Incidentally, the actual price you pay is a half normal price in the promo period.
      By doing weekly shopping in-store will always be cheaper than doing it online.
      There is a fact of info on the Net on how to save money on everyday items but basically put yourself around.
      Also useful always go into Quality Save, B & M stores & Aldi before buying whatever.
      I have almost often found what I was looking for at these stores first.
      Eg 750m can of exterior paint for a garden bench at B & Q £28 Aldi same size tin £5.

    • Reply by Roger F

      As i have been given a weekend to myself ,i plan to create food from all that I currently have lying around rather than stocking up with unnecessary stuff

    • Reply by Printer lady

      Hi do you renew you utilities?

    • Reply by joanneconly5

      When I have a bumper crop of herbs I’ll chop, an put in icecube trays with a drop of water. Once frozen take them out and bag them. Then just use as you need to.

    • Reply by jaynej

      Join your local food larder or community fridge. This is not only about helping out those who are struggling to feed their families but is a great way to reduce landfill. Buy food at reduced costs and stop the supermarkets having to throw it away.

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